demand


demand
demand vb Demand, claim, require, exact are comparable not as close synonyms but as sharing the basic meaning to ask or call for something as due or as necessary or as strongly desired.
Demand strongly implies peremptoriness or insistency; if the subject is a person or sometimes an expression of his will (as a law), it usually implies that he possesses or believes he possesses the right or the authority not only to issue a peremptory request but also to expect its being regarded as a command
{

the physician demanded payment of his bill

}
{

the court demands fair treatment of the accused by the prosecutor

}
{

the father demanded knowledge of what had occurred during his absence from home

}
{

can he [the keeper of a public record] refuse a copy thereof to a person demanding it on the terms prescribed by law?— John Marshall

}
{

instincts which the conventions of good manners and the imperatives of morality demand that they should repress— Huxley

}
If the subject of the verb is a thing, the verb implies the call of necessity or of imperative need
{

the fire that the cool evenings of early spring demandedMary Austin

}
{

the mind and body of a child demand a great deal of play— Russell

}
{

he is best in his plays when dealing with situations which do not demand great emotional concentration— T. S. Eliot

}
Claim implies a demanding either of the delivery or concession of something due one as one's own, one's right, or one's prerogative or of the admission or recognition of something which one asserts or affirms; thus, one who claims a piece of property demands its delivery to him as his own; one who claims that he has solved a problem demands recognition of the truth of his assertion
{

there is no right to freedom or life. But each man does claim such freedom— Alexander

}
{

a genius, say his detractors, can be perverse, and they claim the right to tell this genius when and where and why he is perverse— Read

}
Require is often used interchangeably with demand, but it usually distinctively implies imperativeness such as arises from inner necessity
{

Consecutive thinking absolutely requires personal initiative— Eliot

}
or the compulsion of law or regulation
{

require that every member of the bank's staff be bonded

}
or the exigencies of the situation
{

I shall not go away till you have given me the assurance I requireAusten

}
Exact implies not only demanding something but getting what one demands
{

exact payment of overdue rent

}
{

exact a promise from a friend

}
{

she . . . kept a keen eye on her Court, and exacted prompt and willing obedience from king and archbishops— Henry Adams

}
{

the mistake of exacting reparations in money and then lending Germany the money with which to payTruman

}
Analogous words: request, *ask, solicit: order, *command, charge, enjoin, direct, bid: call, *summon, summons, cite
Contrasted words: waive, resign, *relinquish: concede, allow, *grant

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Demand 5 — homepage Original author(s) Channel 5 …   Wikipedia

  • demand — de·mand 1 n 1: a formal request or call for something (as payment for a debt) esp. based on a right or made with force a shareholder must first make a demand on the corporation s board of directors to act R. C. Clark a written demand for payment… …   Law dictionary

  • Demand — ist der Familienname von Christian Demand (* 1960), deutscher Kunstkritiker und seit 2006 Professor für Kunstgeschichte an der Akademie der Bildenden Künste Nürnberg Heinrich Demand (1902–1974), deutscher Politiker (SPD), nordrhein westfälischer… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Demand — De*mand , n. [F. demande, fr. demander. See {Demand}, v. t.] 1. The act of demanding; an asking with authority; a peremptory urging of a claim; a claiming or challenging as due; requisition; as, the demand of a creditor; a note payable on demand …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • demand — [di mand′, dimänd′] vt. [ME demaunden < OFr demander, to demand < L demandare, to give in charge < de , away, from + mandare, to entrust: see MANDATE] 1. to ask for boldly or urgently 2. to ask for as a right or with authority 3. to… …   English World dictionary

  • Demand — De*mand , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Demanded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Demanding}.] [F. demander, LL. demandare to demand, summon, send word, fr. L. demandare to give in charge, intrust; de + mandare to commit to one s charge, commission, order, command. Cf …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • demand — ► NOUN 1) an insistent and peremptory request, made as of right. 2) (demands) pressing requirements. 3) the desire of purchasers or consumers for a particular commodity or service. ► VERB 1) ask authoritatively or brusquely. 2) insist on having …   English terms dictionary

  • demand — You demand something from or (less commonly) of someone (demanded an apology from or of him), and you make a demand on someone for something (kept putting more demands on the overworked staff for their time) …   Modern English usage

  • demand — [n] question, request appeal, application, arrogation, bid, bidding, call, call for, charge, claim, clamor, command, counterclaim, entreatment, entreaty, exaction, impetration, imploration, importunity, imposition, inquiry, insistence, interest,… …   New thesaurus

  • Demand — De*mand , v. i. To make a demand; to inquire. [1913 Webster] The soldiers likewise demanded of him, saying, And what shall we do? Luke iii. 14. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.